War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0365 Chapter IX. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

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the enemy's approach, the cavalry was not fifteen yards distant. The command "Gallop" was the given, and the rout was made in the greatest confusion. Previous to our encounter, several regiments had passed us at a run, completely routed, without our being aware that we had lost the day. Had there been any support for our battery, had one company of infantry stood fast, the cavalry could easily have been repulsed, and the shameful consequences avoided. Our battery moving at a gallop, the carriages one by one broke down, and the pieces one by one were scattered along the road. I rode with my section till I saw that all was lost, and, after receiving a ball in my horse's neck, I continued on in your company to Centreville. From Centreville I rode with dispatches to General Scott, and arrived at Fort Corcoran at daylight on Monday morning. After partaking of refreshments, I rode back to Vienna, to pick up the stragglers belonging to our company. Throughout the day the non-commissioned officers and privates of my command behaved with the utmost coolness and gallantry.

I am, sir, with much respect, your obedient servant,

S. C. LYFORD,

Second Lieutenant, First Dragoons, U. S. Army.

Captain J. HOWARD CARLISLE,

Commanding Company E, Second Artillery, U. S. Army.

No. 23. Report of Lieutenant Edward B. Hill, First U. S. Artillery.

JULY 26, 1861.

SIR: I have the honor to report that on Sunday, the 21st day of July, at 2.30 a.m., we left our camp at Centrevillee to proceed to Bull Run. At 5 o'clock we opened the action by firing the heavy rifled gun attached to our battery, electing no response. We then moved forward to the foot of the hill, and took a position in the woods on the right. A battery of the enemy presenting itself opposite us, doing much injury to one of our regiments, we opened upon it, and after an hour's sharp firing completely destroyed it. We then used the heavy rifled gun with great advantage. In the afternoon we took a position on the left with Captain Ayres' battery, but found it untenable on account of masked batteries of the enemy the precise situation of which we could not ascertain. We then moved up the hill and halted. The enemy fired shell into this position, and we were ordered to go farther on. We then halted for a few moments, and soon after moved on over the hill. I was detained in the rear of the battery attending to once of the caissons which had lost a wheel. In the mean time Captain Ayres' battery passed by me, so as to come between myself and our battery in front.

When I was ready to move on, I found Captain Ayres' battery preparing for action at the brow of the hill. I then learned that our battery had been attacked by a body of secession cavalry, and all cut to pieces. Captain Ayres then advised me to attach my caisson, battery-wagon, and forage to his battery, and that I should go on and try to discover what had become of our own. On riding ahead I found a complete scene of destruction; wheels, limber-boxes, guns, caissons, dead and wounded men and horses were scattered all along the road. I was enabled, however, to find two pieces which I could bring along, and two men, Corporal Callghan and Private Whitenech. I applied