War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0310 OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W. VA. Chapter IX.

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[Indorsement.]

This is the only secession flag captured during the first Bull Run campaign.

S. P. HEINTZELMAN,

Colonel Seventeenth United States Infantry.

FAIRFAX STATION, July 18, 1861.

Captain J. B. FRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fairfax Court-House:

SIR: I have just received a dispatch from Colonel Heintzelman. He is still at Sangster's, waiting orders. Not knowing whether he has succeeded in communicating with you otherwise, I deem it best to report the fact myself.

I can get guides to Wolf Run Shoals and Bacon Race Church. I deem it necessary to have both telegraphic and railway communication with Alexandria. Have sent word to this effect to General Runyon, and hope it is approved by General McDowell, but would respectfully suggest that orders be issued.

If we could have struck this point and Sangster's about three hours earlier we might have taken about three thousand prisoners.

The bridges beyond have been burnt by the enemy.

Very respectfully,

O. B. WILLCOX,

Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade.

Please forward the inclosed. Can I have a small mounted party of soldiers for carrying dispatches? I have to communicate with yourself, Colonel Heintzelman, and Alexandria, and the horses have to be taken from the teams.

Respectfully, &c.,

O. B. W.

Numbers 3. Report of Brigadier General Daniel Tyler, Connecticut Militia, of action at Blackburn's Ford.

HDQRS. FIRST DIV. DEP'T NORTHEASTERN VIRGINIA,

Washington City, July 27. 1861.

SIR: On the 18th instant your ordered me to take my division, with the two 20-pounder rifled guns, and move against Centreville, to carry that position. My division moved from its encampment at 7 a. m. At 9 a. m. Richardson's brigade reached Centreville, and found that the enemy had retreated the night before-one division on the Warrenton turnpike in the direction of Gainesville, and the other, and by far the largest division, towards Blackburn's Ford, on Bull Run. Finding that Richardson's brigade had turned towards the latter point and halted, for the convenience of obtaining water, I took a squadron of cavalry and two light companies from Richardson's brigade, with Colonel Richardson, to make a reconnaissance, and in feeling our way carefully we soon found ourselves overlooking the strong position of the enemy, situated at Blackburn's Ford, on Bull Run. A moment's observation discovered a battery on the opposite bank, but no great body of troops, although the usual pickets and small detachments showed themselves on the left of the position.