War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0221 Chapter IX. CAMPAIGN IN WEST VIRGINIA.

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received the appointment of major in the Regular Army. Owing to the position of the enemy in front of the brigade in which he was serving as sergeant-major, he requested to be retained until the issue should be settled. Acting yesterday as my volunteer aide with the advance column, Captain Benham testifies it his gallantry and invaluable services during the entire day, and more especially in the face of the enemy.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. A. MORRIS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Major SETH WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Ohio.

BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS, ELLIOTT'S FARM,

Near Belington, Va., July 16, 1861.

SIR: On the morning of the 14th instant I reported to you the operations of the brigade up to the routing of the Confederate forces at Carrick's Ford at about 2 p. m. of the previous day, and I have to state that while our troops were halting for rest our scouts followed close upon the route of the enemy for from four to six miles farther, and on the morning of the 14th we learned that they were fully fifteen miles in advance of us. At about noon of the same day we started for Saint George, in pursuance of orders, which place we reached at night. Without provisions, other that the beeves sent by General McClellan, and in the exhausted state of the command, it was impossible to pursue farther. At Saint George we heard the report that General Hill, agreeably to an order sent by General McClellan, had met the flying enemy, and captured or dispersed the remnant. Twelve wagons, most of them loaded with new clothing, were discovered four miles to the right of our route by our scout, and were taken possession of. Yesterday morning we left Saint George to return to this place, in order to get proper provisions and shelter for the troops.

After a fatiguing march of twenty-three miles, we reached here at about 9 o'clock last night. The command were getting sick from the use of fresh beef only, and many of them preferred doing without beef rather than increase the disease (diarrhea) brought on by its use without bread or salt.

When the reports of the different colonels engaged at Carrick's Frond shall be handed me I will Complete my report of that engagement, in order that individual cases (if such there should be) of special service and gallantry may be made. I am now gathering up all the captured property and having it properly cared for. The limited transportation with this column (which has before reported) will take three or four days to gather up the property strewed from here towards Saint George. A large number of tents have been taken. An inventory of all property will be made as soon as it can possibly be done.

Your letter of the 15th did not reach me till this morning. I shall, therefore, gather the captured property, recruit my command, and, as soon as it is accomplished, proceed to Philippi. I would respectfully state that I have reported to the commanding general as often as it was possible under the circumstances which have surrounded me.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. A. MORRIS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Major S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Huttonsville, Va.