War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0165 Chapter IX. OPERATIONS IN SHENANDOAH VALLEY.

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through Charlestown, over a good road. My depot will be better secured, more convenient, nearer, and line better protected. I cannot now bring from Hagerstown, with present means of transportation, an ample supply of provisions for active operations. I can from Harper's Ferry. I send to Hagerstown an officer to commence to-day the transfer, if assent be given, and I wish an answer to-day. Defeat here is ruin everywhere. I consider a regiment of regulars, and more, if possible, essential to give steadiness to my column and to carry on active operations against a determined opposition, and I urge that my three-months' volunteers be replaced by three-years' men. Many of them are barefooted and cannot be employed for active service. They can be made useful until their term expires for this transfer of depot. Many three-months' men refuse to renew their service. The enemy have retired beyond Winchester, and are said to be fortifying.

R. PATTERSON,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, July 12, 1861-1.30 p. m.

Major-General PATTERSON:

Go where you propose in your letter of the 9th instant. Should that movement cause the enemy to retreat upon Manassas via Strasburg, to follow him would seem at this distance hazardous, whereas the route from Charlestown, via Key's Ferry, Hillsborough, and Leesburg, towards Alexandria, with the use of the canal on the other side of the river for heavy transportation, may be practicable. Consider this suggestion well, and, except in an extreme case, do not recross the Potomac with more than a sufficient detachment for your supplies on the canal.

Let me hear of you on Tuesday. Write often when en route.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

MARTINSBURG, July 13, 1861.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

McClellan's victory received here with great joy; received without comment from thee General-in-Chief. I have given and now give mine. My column must be preserved to insure to the country the fruits of this and other victories, which we hope will follow. My determination is not changed by this news. I would rather lose the chance of accomplishing something brilliant than, by hazarding this column, to destroy the fruits of the campaign to the country by defeat. If wrong, let me be instructed.

R. PATTERSON,

Major-General, Commanding.

MARTINSBURG, July 13, 1861.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Received the announcement of McClellan's victory with great gratification. His success, however, makes no change in my plans. This force is the keystone of the combined movements, and injury to it would counteract the good effects of all victories elsewhere. Johnston is in position beyond Winchester, to be re-enforced, and his strength doubled just as I would reach him. My position is a strong one, but I must act cautiously whilst preparing to strike.

R. PATTERSON,

Major-General.