War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0121 Chapter IX. ROCKVILLE EXPEDITION.

Search Civil War Official Records

with the greatest demonstration of joy and relief. I think it important to send a Government operator for the telegraph here and at Harper's Ferry.

Very respectfully, I am, sir, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Colonel Fourteenth Infantry, Commanding Expedition.

Lieutenant Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters of the Army.

POINT OF ROCKS, July 5, 1861.

COLONEL: I have come down this far to hasten the movements of the troops. The New Hampshire First, the rear regiment, has come up. The men are hardly in moving condition this afternoon. The last companies of the Ninth New York go up to the Ferry this afternoon, and will be followed by part of the New Hampshire.

It will be necessary to leave two or more companies at this place to keep up our communications for supplies. Captain Abert is engaged now in reconnoitering the fords above Harper's Ferry and securing boats in which part of the passage can be effected.

Very respectfully, colonel, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Colonel Fourteenth Infantry, Commanding Expedition.

Lieutenant Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters of the Army.

OPPOSITE HARPER'S FERRY, July 5, 1861.

COLONEL: Yesterday afternoon, while I was engaged in bringing up more troops from the Point of Rocks, Harper's Ferry was suddenly occupied by a few of the enemy, who opened fire on our pickets. The latter were re-enforced by a company of the Ninth New York Regiment, and firing was kept up for about half an hour, resulting in a slight loss on both sides; on ours one private killed and three wounded. As far as now known the loss of the enemy was two killed and two severely wounded, but there are reports that his loss was greater. The enemy retired to the rear of the town.

I have this morning received a letter from Major Porter, assistant adjutant-general, Department of Pennsylvania, of which a copy is inclosed herewith.

The movement directed to be made by infantry alone, in a country occupied by hostile cavalry, will be somewhat hazardous.

Very respectfully, colonel, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,.

Colonel Fourteenth Infantry, Commanding Expedition.

Lieutenant Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters of the Army.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA.

Martinsburg, Va., July 4, 1861.,

SIR: The commanding general wishes you to join this column now temporarily halted for provisions to be brought up. Under the impression you have crossed the river near Harper's Ferry, he directs you to