War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0113 Chapter IX. ROCKVILLE EXPEDITION.

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stick them in their musket boxes and join the United States forces whenever they can; that some of the impressed men are so obstinate that arms were not given to them, but they were carried away and made to do police duty in the camps. The troops at Harper's Ferry were badly fed and badly clothed; had very poor shoes, and few of them.

There is nothing new to be communicated from this command.

Very respectfully, colonel, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Colonel Fourteenth Infantry, Commanding Expedition.

Lieutenant Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters of the Army.

POOLESVILLE, June 20, 1861.

COLONEL: I sent a trusty messenger up the river yesterday as far as opposite Harper's Ferry. He reports that there were no troops of the United States at or near that place. Harper's Ferry was completely deserted, except by a few poor families.

An action between our forces and those of the enemy at Martinsburg was vaguely reported as a completely defeat of the enemy.

I find it necessary to occupy the ferry and fords at Monocacy, and for this purpose order up the Ninth New York this evening. I go in a few minutes to take possession, hoping to capture the ferry boat, which the enemy were trying to raise last night. More artillery is needed, and I hope may be furnished me.

It is difficult to restrain the New Hampshire troops from crossing the river but the officers seem disposed to do their duty in carrying out orders.

The people in the neighborhood seem to gain confidence in the Government day by day, and the troops, especially the Pennsylvania First, are very popular with them. I find that the women and children had been taught by the Virginians and active secessionists here to expect every species of outrage and horror on the arrival of the United States troops. The reaction is very strong, and the troops are now looked to for protection.

I am informed that repairs will be immediately commenced on the canal, and that the line will be in order in nine or ten days' time. It will require careful guarding at present.

Very respectfully, I am, colonel,your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Colonel Fourteenth Infantry, Commanding Expedition.

Lieutenant Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters of the Army.

POOLESVILLE, June 21, 1861.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that the Ninth New York Regiment takes post this evening at the Monocacy Ferry, to watch the river above and below.

The Eighth Battalion District of Columbia Volunteers has been ordered up from Tennallytown to Great Falls. The officers of the Second Battalion District of Columbia Volunteers, having forgotten themselves so far as to request that the battalion might be relieved from duty and

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