War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0108 OPERATIONS IN MD., AND PA., VA., AND W. VA. Chapter IX

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ROCKVILLE, June 14, 1861-8 o'clock a.m.

COLONEL: The First Regiment Pennsylvania was pushed forward early this morning two miles beyond the position of the New York Ninth Regiment, on the road to the two ferries. The section of Griffin's battery has gone to the same point. The First New Hampshire will leave this evening, bivouac nine miles from this, and in the cool of the morning, proceed to Poolesville. I leave within the hour, taking the cavalry force to make a reconnaissance beyond Poolesville, towards the ferries, where there are said to be 300 to 400 of the enemy. I do not credit the report, but, if true, it will not be difficult to capture them.

From Poolesville it will be easy to march either on the ferries or to the Point of Rocks, as may be deemed most advisable.

The command is in good health and fine spirits.

I inclose returns of elections in this region, showing a large majority for the Union candidate for Congress.

Very respectfully, I am, colonel, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Colonel Fourteenth Infantry, Commanding Expedition.

Lieutenant Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters of the Army.

POOLESVILLE, June 15, 1861.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that the troops of the expedition have to-night occupied Edwards Ferry and Conrad's Ferry, the two approaches to Leesburg. The former is held by a portion of the Pennsylvania regiment, a piece of artillery under Lieutenant Hasbrouck, and twenty cavalry. The latter is held by a portion of the First New Hampshire Regiment.

It is believed here that Harper's Ferry has been evacuated, and that the garrison has retired, by way of Winchester, towards Manassas Junction. I shall send scouts out to-morrow. Ascertain, if practicable, the truth or falsity of the story.

Lieutenant-Colonel Everett reports that he thinks the enemy are erecting works nearly opposite his position, on the canal, at the mouth of the works nearly opposite his position, on the canal, at the mouth of the Seneca Creek. The enemy at Leesburg were frightened, it is said, on Thursday evening, and burned the Goose Creek Bridge (railroad), tore up track, burned cars, &c. They have not, however, yet evacuated the place. The command is well and doing well.

Very respectfully, colonel, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Colonel, Commanding Expedition.

Lieutenant Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters of the Army.

POOLESVILLE, June 16, 1861.

COLONEL: I reported last night the occupation of the two nearest ferries across the Potomac. One hour after that report was written there was a very large fire some miles to the westward of our position here, on the Virginia side. Those who know the country well state that it must have been the destruction of the turnpike bridge over Goose Creek.

The enemy occupy with small (visible) force the Virginia landing of Edwards Ferry, and it is my impression that they have four pieces of