War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0071 Chapter IX. ACTION AT PHILIPPI, W. VA.

Search Civil War Official Records

formed that two companies of negroes, armed and uniformed, have been seen at Fairmont. The country to the northwest is in a state of revolution, all law-abiding citizens being driven off by the traitors, assisted by Northern troops. The private property of secessionists, but other wise inoffensive citizens, their cattle, young unbroken horses and colts, and the clothing of women and children, have been seized and taken off from citizens of Philippi. Captain Alexander will give verbally my additional information that may be desired as to the condition of this command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. PORTERFIELD,

Colonel of Volunteers, Commanding.

Colonel R. S. GARNETT,

Adjutant-General Virginia Forces, Richmond, Va.

HEADQUARTERS VIRGINIA FORCES,

Randolph County, Va., June 11, 1861.

SIR: I omitted to state in my last report that Lieutenant Colonel William L. Jackson, Virginia Volunteers, had reported to me for duty. He has been very active, and will become a most useful officer. Colonel Willey, who has also been very zealous and useful, was left sick in Philippi. I have assurance that he shall be well treated.

The enemy remains at Philippi, where they are reported to have about five thousand men, and are fortifying themselves. The same number are said to be at Grafton. From five hundred to one thousand are said to be at the Cheat River Bridge; but of this I have no reliable information. Other forces are stationed at different points on the railroads. I understand their object to be occupy the western part of the State, to the Aleghanies or Blue Ridge, if possible. The greatest outrages have, in numerous cases, been perpetrated upon the private property of secessionists. Some militia companies have recently joined this command. A regiment from Tennessee is expected the to-morrow, having in charge, as I am informed, some pieces of heavy artillery. No pieces heavier than 6-pounders should be sent to this country, until some position is selected to be fortified and a strong and reliable infantry force sent to support it. I am not informed what quantity of ammunition is in Staunton. I have never received any other than the most limited supplies from that place. The percussion caps sent have nearly all been of small size for shot-guns and not large enough for muskets. As re-enforcement are now expected, and we shall have active service in this part of the State, I desire to be continued on duty here. It was not until after repeated calls for aid, and when left, with a small militia force entirely unprepared for the field, that I asked for duty elsewhere. Beverly is now occupied by our cavalry.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. PORTERFIELD,

Colonel of Volunteers, Commanding.

Colonel R. S. GARNETT, Adjutant-General, Richmond Va.

HEADQUARTERS VIRGINIA OF FORCES,

Richmond, Va., June 13, 1861.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 9th has been received. I regret much the unfortunate circumstances with which you have been beset, and ap