War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0653 Chapter VIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Numbers 12. Report of Captain S. T. Benning, Texas Troops, of the abandonment of the U. S. posts in the Indian Territory.

BONHAM, May 14, 1861.

DEAR SIR: I hereby inclose an inventory of all the goods and property found and taken at Fort Arbuckle, all of which I turned over to the Chickasaw Indians, by order of William C. Young, who is State regimental colonel. Said Indians are at present taking care of said post and all property therein contained. The United States Government troops under Emory had abandoned said fort a few days previous to my entering and taking command of the same. I am solicitous that you send me a captain's commission to occupy said post as one of the posts belonging to the Southern Confederacy. I have a company of cavalry in readiness for that post or any other that it may please your honor to assign us. Fort Washita and Fort Cobb, both being situated in Chickasaw Nation, were also abandoned, leaving considerable property in each.

Colonel Young has formed a treaty of peace with the Reserve Indians, conditioned that the Southern Confederacy feed and protect them, as heretofore done by the United States Government at a very heavy expense, and that, too, without the approval of but very few of the people in this State. It is considered by the sovereigns here as a worse than needless expense.

Hoping to hear from you soon, I remain, with respect, yours, &c.,

S. T. BENNING,

Captain of Fanning County Company.

Honorable I. POPE WALKER.

CORRESPONDENCE AND ORDERS RELATING TO EVENTS IN ARKANSAS THE INDIAN TERRITORY, AND MISSOURI FROM FEBRUARY 7 TO MAY 9, 1861.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington February 13, 1861.

Brigadier General W. S. HARNEY, Commanding Department of the West:

SIR: The following dispatch was sent you by telegraph to-day:

Heavy you in the Saint Louis Arsenal troops enough to defend it? Ought you not to send up all the men from Jefferson Barracks?

WINFIELD SCOTT.

The General-in-Chief desires to strengthen that dispatch by calling your attention to these considerations: That it is best to move in advance of excitement; that it is possible, when an emergency arises, re-enforcements may be cu off, and that all the force may now by usefully employed at work in adding to the defenses of the arsenal.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE W. LAY,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Aide-de-Camp.