War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0598 OPERATIONS IN TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO. Chapter VII.

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to last to that point, if possible. The troops will march with their arms and ammunition, the necessary clothing, and camp equipage. No extra baggage will be taken.

By order of Colonel C. A. Waite:

W. A. NICHOLS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, March 12, 1861.

Colonel CARLOS A WAITE,

U. S. Army, or senior officer on duty with U. S. troops at Brazos and Indianola, Tex.:

SIR: The General-in-Chief directs that the troops arriving at Brazos and at Indianola, Tex., for embarkation, shall proceed to the harbor of New York, where they will receive further orders.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS,

No. 50.

San Antonio, March 19, 1861.

Major Sackfield Maclin, paymaster, U. S. Army, having accepted a military appointment under the State of Texas, and having entered upon the duties of that office, will immediately transfer to Major Daniel McClure, paymaster, U. S. Army, all funds pertaining to the Pay Department which may be in his hands or in any way under his control, in order that the companies of his district which are daily arriving at this place may be paid.

By order of Colonel C. A. Waite:

W. A. NICHOLS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, March 19, 1861. (Received April 1, 1861.)

Colonel CARLOS A. WAITE,

U. S. Army, Commanding the Department of Texas:

SIR: If the number of troops under orders to leave Texas and not yet embarked, or, if embarked, still within your call, be sufficient, you will immediately form a strongly-entrenched camp at some suitable point convenient to and covering the post of Indianola, of not less than five hundred, but preferably of twelve hundred, men, and hold the same against hostile Texans until further orders.

With the troops you will retain your means of transportation, with all the subsistence that can be spared from the steamers sent from New York to Texas for the reception of troops, together with one of those steamers for a time-the one on which the United States will have to pay the least damage-and discharge the other steamers. And if there be one or (preferably) two companies not needed for the above camp, you will send such company or companies by the steamers to Key West, to occupy the barracks on that island. If there be still a surplus of troops beyond those objects, they will proceed to New York in the steamers.

The objects of the entrenched camp near Indianola are, first, to keep