War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0579 Chapter VII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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CORRESPONDENCE AND ORDERS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO FROM FEBRUARY 1 TO JUNE 11, 1861.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

SAN ANTONIO, December 13, 1860.

Lieutenant General W. SCOTT, Commanding U. S. Army, New York:

GENERAL: I think there can be no doubt that many of the Southern States will secede from the Union. The State of Texas will be among the number, and, from all appearance at present, it will be at an early day, certainly before the 4th of March next. What is to be done with public property in charge of the Army? The arsenal at this place has some ordnance and other munitions of war. I do not expect an order for the present for the disposition of them, but I would be pleased to receive yours views and suggestions. My course as respects myself will be to remain at my post and protect this frontier as long as I can, and then, when turned adrift, make vy way home, if I have one. I would be pleased to hear from you at your earliest convenience.

I am, general, with sentiments of respect and regard, yours, &c.,

D. E. TWIGGS.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS,

San Antonio, December 27, 1860.

(Received January 12, 1861.)

Lieutenant Colonel L. THOMAS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. of the Army, New York:

SIR: As there can be no doubt that many of the Southern States, and Texas among the number, will cease to be members of the Union, I respectfully ask instructions, or some intimation, as to the disposition of the United States property, such as arms, ammunition, and transportation. It appears to me some steps should be taken very soon. I shall remain here until my service can no longer be available.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. E. TWIGGS,

Bvt. Major General U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

WASHINGTON, December 28, 1860.

Major General D. E. TWIGGS:

MY DEAR GENERAL: The General-in-Chief, himself laboring for the time under an attack of sickness, desires me to acknowledge and thank you for your letter of the 13th instant, the spirit of which he highly approves. He says you will understand its remaining him vividly of the interview he had with you in Augusta in 1862.

In cases of political disturbance, involving local conflict with the authority of the General Government, the General-in-Chief considers that the military questions, such as you suggest, contain a political element, with the regard to which, and in due deference to the chief executive authority, no extraordinary instructions concerning them must be issued without the consent of such authority.