War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0550 OPERATIONS IN TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO. Chapter VII.

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have been opened, and that all important communications have been withheld.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. A. WAITE,

Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

To the ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS,

San Antonio, March 27, 1861.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that thee companies of the First Infantry, two companies of the Eighth Infantry, and six companies of the Second Cavalry have already passed though this place on their way to the camp near Green Lake, and that probably before the end of the present month four additional companies will arrive here on their way to their camp. These nineteen companies amount to some thirty offices, and about twelve hundred and seventy five enlisted men, which with the laundresses, officers' servants, &c., will swell the number to near thirteen hundred and fifty persons.

The remainder of the companies in this department will reach Green Lake by the 15th or 20th of April, except the seven companies of the Eighth Infantry, stationed at Forts Bliss, Quitman, Davis, and Stockton, which cannot be at the coast and ready to embark before the first week in May.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. A. WAITE,

Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

To the ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS,

San Antonio, April 1, 1861.

SIR: This morning I had the honor to receive, by Lieutenant C. R. Collins, Topographical Engineers, a communication from the General-in-Chief, dated Washington, March 19, 1861, and a few hours after, by the hand of Lieutenant W. Jones, First Infantry, a duplicate of the same, with the addition of a postscript in relation to the concentration of the troops at Indianola, &c., for the purpose of giving aid to the Union party in Texas.*

Yesterday I received from Governor Houston, through the agency of an influential Union man, a note dated at Austin, the 29th ultimo, and one of the same date from F. W. Lander, a Government agent who recently visited this State, which are herewith inclosed. By these communications it will be seen that Governor Houston not only declines all military assistance from the United States, but strongly protests against a concentration of troops, or the construction of fortifications, within the borders of Texas. He also earnestly requests that the troops may be moved from the State at the "earliest day practicable."

So for from three being any body of men collected of the purpose of sustaining the governor in the exercise of his official functions, nothing of the kind, so far as I can learn, has ever been contemplated. The

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*See "Correspondence and Orders, etc.," p.598.

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