War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0496 THE SECESSION OF LOUISIANA. Chapter VI.

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The supply of material of these descriptions remaining on hand is ample for the wants of the State. In this action I trust to meet with the approval of the legislature.

In all these movements for the defense and protection of the State, I am proud to say that I have been supported with patriotic cheerfulness and alacrity by the volunteer soldiery of the State.

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It is not within the providence of the legislature or the executive to forestall the action of the State convention by advising any particular form for the assertion of the rights of the State in the reclaiming of her independence, or in executing her sovereign will, as announced by that tribunal. The future of our Louisiana rests in the counsels which shall be adopted by her freely chosen representatives; and we have reason to trust that they will decide calmly, wisely, and well. But we may be permitted to invoke the merciful care of Divine Providence so to guide them in the path which leads to safety, to honor, and to prosperity, that they may be sustained by the hearts and hands of a confiding people in building up a separate nationally, or finding an honorable place in a new and more perfect union of equal confederated States.

THOS. O. MOORE,

Governor.

CORRESPONDENCE AND ORDERS RELATING TO AFFAIRS IN LOUISIANA FROM JANUARY 10 TO FEBRUARY 19, 1861.

JANUARY 10, 1861.

DANIEL W. ADAMS,

Military Board, New Orleans:

Secret attempts continue to be made to garrison Southern ports. We think there is special reason to fear surprise from Gulf squadron.

J. P. BENJAMIN.

JNO. SLIDELL.

[JANUARY 10, 1861.]

Gov. T. O. MOORE,

Baton Rouge:

The danger is not from Saint Louis, but from sea.

JOHN SLIDELL.

NEW ORLEANS, January 12, 1861.

General JOS. G. TOTTEN,

Chief Engineer, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I this morning received a telegram from the overseer at Fort Saint Philip, stating that fort as well as Fort Jackson had been taken possession of by the State troops, and asking for instructions. My instructions to him were to stop operations at once, and to close all accounts with the Government, at the same time transmitting to you by telegraph a statement of the occurrence. The hands discharged will be up here in a day or two, and there is nothing to pay them with. What the actual amount due them is I cannot tell until I hear again from Mr. Dart, the overseer; but $300 would cover it, and I respectfully suggest that if the convenience of the Treasury does not admit of the remittance of the remainder of the