War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0493 Chapter VI. REPORTS, ETC.

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with my duties while I was in the Army of the United States that I do not explain to the satisfaction of the proper officers of the United States Government.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. C. MYERS.

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington City, D. C.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS LOUISIANA MILITIA,

Adjutant-General's Office, New Orleans, January 28, 1861.

SIR: In the name of the sovereign State of Louisiana, I now demand of you possession of all the quartermaster's and commissary stores, and of all property under your control and in your possession belonging to the United States of America, for which the State of Louisiana is and will be accountable, and receipts for the same will be given you.

By order of Thos. O. Moore, governor and commander-in-chief:

M. GRIVOT,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Louisiana.

Lieutenant Colonel A. C. MYERS,

Quartermaster, U. S. Army, New Orleans.

No. 6. Report of Major Albert J. Smith, paymaster, U. S. Army, of the seizure of his office at New Orleans.

NEW ORLEANS, February 19, 1861.

SIR: My office, furniture, blanks, &c., have been taken by the State, and now occupied by State officers. My clerk also goes with his State. The small amount of funds to my credit with the assistant treasurer is fully respected, but what will be done by the Southern Congress it is impossible to say. My duties are little or nothing, and cold be as well attended to in Washington. Shall I return to that place? I am at my hotel waiting your instructions. Please inform me if the office messenger shall be discharged, or shall I bring him on to Washington with me? He would be serviceable at my next station.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALBERT J. SMITH,

Paymaster, U. S. Army.

Colonel BENJAMIN F. LARNED,

Paymaster-General U. S. Army, Washington City.

No. 7. Extracts from the message of the governor of Louisiana to the State legislature, January 22, 1861.

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My opinions on the momentous questions which have convulsed and are destroying the Federal Union, were fully expressed in my message at the recent extra session of the legislature. Your prompt action