War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0481 Chapter V. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

CORRESPONDENCE AND ORDERS RELATING TO AFFAIRS IN NORTH CAROLINA FROM OCTOBER 20, 1860, TO MAY 20, 1861.

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Raleigh, November 19, 1860.

Honorable JOHN B. FLOYD,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Herewith I transmit a copy of a letter from this department to the Charlotte (N. C.) Bulletin, relative to a late movement of United States troops of Fayetteville, in this State. I avail myself of the occasion to say that a publication of the reasons that influenced the administration to send United States troops to Fayetteville is due to the executive and the people of North Carolina. Such a measure is here notoriously unnecessary, and has produced no little irritation in the public mind. Their immediate removal would be a proper and politic step, and, if the Government has any other use for them, one that would conduce to the interests of the public service. I ask, therefore, that these troops be removed.

Respectfully,

JOHN W. ELLIS.

[Inclosure.]

EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

Raleigh, November 16, 1860.

Colonel E. H. BRITTON,

Editor Bulletin:

SIR: In to-day's Bulletin I find an extract from the Norfolk Herald, in which it is stated as a rumor that the President had ordered a company of United States troops to Fayetteville at the "solicitation of the governor of North Carolina."

I wish to say through your columns that I had no previous knowledge of the President's intention to send such troops to Fayetteville, and certainly never made any such request of him. I know nothing of his purposes in doing so, and regard the measure as wholly unnecessary within itself, and at this time exceedingly imprudent, as tending to increase the irritation of public mind.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

JOHN W. ELLIS.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, November 22, 1860.

His Excellency JOHN W. ELLIS,

Governor of North Carolina, Raleigh:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 19th instant, inquiring the reasons for stationing troops at the United States Arsenal at Fayetteville, and urging their immediate removal. In reply, I beg to inclose for your information a copy of a letter from the mayor of Fayetteville, accompanied by petitions from sunder citizens of that town, requesting that the troops in question might be stationed there for the protection of the arms and ammunition at the post.

I regret that the movement of troops, made at considerable expense to the United States, and intended alone to give a sense of security to

31 R R