War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0433 Chapter IV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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weeks in removing articles from the navy-yard to Pensacola, from whence they were sent away by railroad, and that the batteries at and near the yard are very numerous and have large guns in them. The man is intelligent and has given me considerable information, which, of course, I received with large qualification.

I again respectfully repeat what I said in one of my earliest letters, that the commanding officer of this fort should been secret-service money, to be expended at his discretion.

My sick-list is heavy and increasing, having this morning upwards of ninety on it-none serious-arising from hard work in the sun and in the water, sleeping in damp casemates, and drinking impure water. We have been nearly six weeks without rain, and with only two light storms since. One of the cistern leaked and we lost the water, and that of the other has to be used with great economy and only for drinking, water for cooking purposes being obtained by singing wells. I am having a temporary hospital built about a mile from the fort, near the beach. When finished the sick will have a better chance than they now have of recovery. I have lost but three by death, one of which can be an accident. I shall not send the negroes back, as I will never by voluntarily instrumental in returning a poor wretch to slavery, but will hold them subject to orders.

I am very much in want of a powerful spy-glass or telescope. We have plenty of ordinary ones, but with one of great power we could constantly possess ourselves of the most valuable information of the movements of the enemy.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HARVEY BROWN,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA,

Fort Pickens, June 24, 1861.

Lieutenant Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I respectfully report to you that the steamer Illinois arrived here on the 23rd instant with twenty-eight Dahlgren 9-inch guns and implements and some ammunition for same. This is here whole cargo. and not one article on board here is wanted or can advantageously be used here. I shall not therefore touch her cargo, but, having embarked Hunt's battery on board, shall send here to Tortugas to be unloaded there. Permit me respectfully to suggest that the good of the service will be advanced by only sending us those articles for which we make requisitions and which we want, and not multitudes of articles which only encumber us. These Dahlgren guns are not fitted for our service, and their shells are fused in such a manner that only one-third of those sent can be used at all, and these are of too short range; so that were I to land these guns, I should have only 700 shell. I have no doubt of their being sent under an impression of doing us good service, whereas we are only embarrassed by these kind intentions, which are very expensive to the Government. I have ordered Hunt's battery to embark on board the Illinois. Barry's will in about ten days on board the Vanderbilt.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HARVEY BROWN,

Colonel, Commanding.

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