War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0348 OPERATIONS IN FLORIDA. Chapter IV.

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bark stranded at one and one-half miles from shore, with her sails set and abandoned by her crew, who had just landed, and in the offing was a large United States man-of-war, which I have since learned was the Vincennes. The bark was one of the prizes of the Jeff. Davis private, seeking a harbor, and which she very nearly effected. After much maneuvering the man-of-war anchored, sent out her boats, which, finding it in vain to try to save the vessel, set fire to her, and she is burned to the water's edge. Our 6-pounders were unavailing, and I take occasion to say that we have not a military company at this post capable of service as artilleries. Few of our volunteers have ever seen anything larger than a musket before coming to this station. The enemy can at any moment land here and take possession without much hinderance four our defensive works. We are entirely at this mercy. After setting fire to the vessel the man-of-war left our shores, and has not since been seen till late to-day. I learn she was seen this afternoon again in the offing. The name of the prize vessel is the Alvarado, owned in Boston, commander by G. C. Whiting. She left Cape Town, Table Bay, in Africa, on June 3. Her cargo was wool, sheep and goat skins, old copper and iron, and some crude medicines, and was valued at $70,000. She was taken by the Jeff. Davis on July 21, in latitude 25o 30' and longitude 61o. Cargo owned by Isaac Taylor, of Boston, Mass. Captain Whiting and wife, with a negro steward, were on board of the prize sent home by Captain Coxsitter, with no other apparel than that they had on. I had them sent to a boarding house, and shall communicate with the Confederate States marshal, and put them under his charge. The ladies with great philanthropy have raised enough money to clothe our enemies. They will, therefore, be provided for. The prize crew are all safe, and were glad to escape in a boat from the stranded bark.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. YUELL,

Captain, and A. C. S.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR,

Richmond, Va.

CORRESPONDENCE AND ORDERS RELATING SPECIALLY TO THE OPERATIONS IN FLORIDA FROM JANUARY 6 TO AUGUST 31, 1861.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

SENATE CHAMBER, December 21, 1860.

Honorable JOHN B. FLOYD,

Secretary of War:

SIR: You will;l oblige me by a statement of the officers connected with the Army of the United States who were appointed from Florida, their rank, and pay.

Respectfully yours,

D. L. YULEE,

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, December 28, 1860.

Honorable D. L. YULLE,

Senate:

SIR: In answer to your letter of the 21st instant I have the honor to inclose to you a statement showing the names, rank, and pay, and emol-