War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0313 Chapter I. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HDQRS. PROV. ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., April 13, 1861.

General JAMES SIMONS,

Morris Island, S. C.:

GENERAL: Major Anderson will evacuate Fort Sumter to-morrow morning, when he will be sent to one of the United States vessels out-side of the harbor. He will be allowed the privilege of saluting his flag on lowering it.

You will please direct that the ranking officers of Engineers and Artillery on the island accompany the detachment of one company, already ordered out as a part of a garrison to Fort Sumter, who will make a report of the exact present condition of the fort and its defenses.

I reaming, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

FORT MOULTRIE, S. C., April 13, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD,

Charlest, S. C.:

GENERAL: Fort Sumter has been set on fire, and as it is very important (with the vessels outside threatening to enter) to have all experience, I have determined to remain and avoid or prevent a re-enforcement. I do not think that there are more than three vessels off. Colonel Ripley and myself will endeavor to prevent an entry here to-night. I will, as you said, make myself useful; more so, probably, than I could at any other point . I shall go out in a row-boat during the night, with signals arranged, and reconnoiter the entrance and give timely notice of any boats approaching. I think the fire-hulk inside of Sumter had better not be lighted, as it will probably dim our vision.

I have just made out the vessels off. They are the Pawnee, Harriet Lane, Nashville, Atlantic, and a merchant schooner. They cannot enter in their vessels. With a good lookout (for a lookout stationed here, and a boat off in the channel, together with their fire-hulks, which are still floating in a line around Fort Sumter), I think you need have no fear of an entrance here. They are all here, and in fine spirits. Ripley is a most valuable officer-cool, collected, and energetic. He keeps all in spirits and up to their work. I have all the batteries on this island, and give the best directions, as I think may be useful, particularly in regard to looking out for and firing at boats or shipping. The guns are all intact, and in fine working order.

Respectfully,

H. J. HARSTENE.

HEADQUARTERS MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., April 113, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD,

Charleston, S. C.:

MY DEAR GENERAL: We require one thousand or twelve hundred men to re-enforce this position. Nothing should be left to chance. None have yet arrived, and this command will be worn out. The troops have been under arms all night. Six of the hostile ships are in the positions they occupied at dark last night. The two nearest are the Lane and the Prawnee. With these vessels so close to us, I cannot relax my vigi-