War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0301 Chapter I. CORREPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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his answer was received a telegraphic dispatch (a copy of which is inclosed) was sent to you, communicating its purport, and asking for your instructions. I regret to add here that the new levies at Morris Island are not in as complete a state of organization as I desire; but I hope, in the event of an attempt to land by the enemy, that I will be able to give you a satisfactory account of them.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

CHARLESTON, April 11, 1861.

Honorable L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War:

Major Anderson replies: "I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication demanding the evacuation of this fort, and to say in reply thereto that it is a demand with which I regret that my sense of honor and of my obligations to my Government prevent my compliance." He says verbally: "I will await the first shot, and if you do not batter us to pieces we will be starved out in a few days."

Answer.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

MONTGOMERY, April 11, 1861.

General BEUAREGARD,

Charleston:

Do not desire needlessly to bombard Fort Sumter. If Major Anderson will state the time at which, as indicated by him, he will evacuate, and agree that in the mean time he will not use his guns against us unless our should be employed against Fort Sumer, you are authorized thus to avoid the effusion of blood. If this or its equivalent be refused, reduce the fort as you judgment decides to be most practicable.

L. P. WALKER.

WASHINGTON, April 11, 1861.

General G. T. BEUAREGARD:

The Tribune of to-day declares the main object of the expedition to be the relief of Sumter, and that a force will be landed which will overcome all opposition.

ROMAN.

CRAWFORD.

FORSYTH.

CHARLESTON, S. C., April 11, 1861.

ROMAN, CRAWFORD, and FORSYTH,

Commissioners Confederate States, Washington, D. C.:

Evacuation of Fort Sumter will be demanded to-day. If refused, hostilities will commence to-night. Answer.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.