War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0232 OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S. C. Chapter I.

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Numbers 91.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., April 2, 1861.

(Received A. G. O., April 5.)

Colonel L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report everything quiet, and, as far as we can see, no work going on.

I received to-day a copy of General Orders Numbers 7, assigning Brevet Captain Talbot to duty in the Adjutant-General's Department. The captain having remained with this garrison during our imprisonment in this fort is very desirous of being permitted to stay as long as the command does, and as we have so few officers I shall take the liberty of keeping him a few days longer, until I am certain there will be no need of his services.

Our sick-list is, I am sorry to say, on the increase. The doctor reports this morning two cases of dysentery. The governor has not yet given authority for me to send off the Engineer employes.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

Numbers 92.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., April 3, 1861.

(Received A. G. O., April 6.)

Colonel L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that we do not see them at work this morning. One of the guard-boats anchored at 8 o'clock last night (a schooner) about four hundred yards from the left shoulder angle of this work. She is still there.

The governor of South Carolina has not sent the permission alluded to yesterday, and to-day notice has been received that no butter can be sent down and only one quarter of a box of soap. These little matters indicate, perhaps, an intention to stop our supplies entirely. I must, therefore, most respectfully and urgently ask for instructions what I am to do as soon as my provisions are exhausted. Our bread will last four or five days.

Hoping that definite and full instructions will be sent to me immediately,

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, April 3, 1861.

To the SECRETARY OF WAR:

Under the strongest convictions on some military questions upon which great political events seem about to turn, I feel impelled to state them, since they are of a nature to derive, possibly, a little weight from my official relation to them, and since, moreover, circumstances might cause my failing to make the statement in time to be considered as a grave delinquency. I refer particularly to the question of defending or abandoning Fort Sumter and Fort Pickens.

Fort Sumter.-In addition to what I have heretofore said as to the impracticability of efficiently re-enforcing and supplying this fort, I will now say only that if the fort was filled with men and munitions it could