War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0226 OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S. C. Chapter I.

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FORT SUMTER, S. C., March 28, 1861.

General JOS. G. TOTTEN,

Chief Engineer U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that there is a general suspension of operations in the batteries around us. The guns and materials on the beach on Cummings Point remain in precisely the same position they have occupied for three days. No repairs of parapets even are in progress, and it is reported that the sling-cart was removed to the city yesterday. At the mortar battery on James Island, where a few hands have been constantly at work for some time, there is now no appearance of labor.

I have received your letter of the 26th, and will follow its instructions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Captain of Engineers.

FORT SUMTER, S. C., March 28, 1861.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD, Charleston, S. C.:

DEAR GENERAL: A military irregularity occurred yesterday, which I deem proper to mention to you. I heard, after your flag had returned to the city, that a parcel had been brought in the boat, and left, without my knowledge. Orders have been given which will prevent the recurrence of such an irregularity. Nothing should have been received from the boat except your letter. Trusting that in a few days we shall be placed in a position which will be more agreeable and acceptable to both of us than the anomalous one we now occupy,

I am, dear general, yours, truly,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, U. S. Army, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., March 29, 1861.

Major ROBERT ANDERSON, U. S. Army,

Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S. C.:

DEAR MAJOR: Your note of yesterday has just been received. I regret to hear of the irregularity complained of. When I approved of the parcel referred to being carried to Fort Sumter, it was supposed, as a matter of course, that it would not be received without your consent. No further privileges of the kind will hereafter be granted.

Hoping that we may soon meet on the same friendly footing as heretofore, I remain, dear major, yours, very truly,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 29, 1861.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR:

SIR: I desire that an expedition, to move by sea, be got ready to sail as early as the 6th of April next, the whole according to memorandum attached, and that you co-operate with the Secretary of the Navy for that object.

Your obedient servant,

A. LINCOLN.