War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0210 OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S. C. Chapter I.

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strength, and probably new batteries out of sight are being constructed, for the large working party constantly employed on the point up to this time is now nowhere to be seen. The guns are being mounted by their soldiers. A few hands are at work on the covered way near the mortar battery on James Island.

Very little was done here yesterday, on account of the weather. It is, however, quite pleasant to-day. I have nearly finished filling up the openings of the first tier of loopholes on the gorge. In case the order arrives the evacuate this fort, is it the wish of the Department that I shall remove all the Engineer material that I can?

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Captain, Engineers.

P. S.-I feel sure that I have sufficient funds to pay all dues up to the 1st of April, but least some unforeseen cirumcstance should arise which would make it necessary ot have more money, I would respectfully ask that Lieutenant Gillmore be instructed to honor my checks on the assistant treasurer (in case I am forced to overdraw), say to one thousand dollars.

J. G. FOSTER,

Captain, Engineers.

Numbers 79.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., March 21, 1861.

Colonel L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that a quantity of iron was unloaded about 11 o'clock last night from a steamboat at Cummings Point. We see the work mentioned yesterday is being prosecuted this morning. Nothing else has occurred attracting attention since my last letter, except the firing yesterday afternoon of some two hundred blank cartridges from the Fort Moultrie battery.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

FORT SUMTER, S. C., March 21, 1861.

General JOS. G. TOTTEN,

Chief Engineer U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: The work on the channel batteries on Morris Island still continues. A large quantity of material, lumber, and apparently railroad iron was landed last night on the beach at Cummings Point. Quite a large number of troops are kept here and also on Sullivan's Island.

A liberal expenditure of powder was made yesterday at Fort Moultrie in firing blank cartridges, apparently to accustom the men to rapid firing. All the guns ont he channel front and the front in this direction were fired several times in rapid succession, making over two hundred guns in all. The work on the covered way leading to the mortar battery on James Island is still slowly continued. There does not appear to be much work on the entrenchments themselves going forward, probably in consequence of the high wind that is prevailing. More, however, is being done in mounting guns.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Captain, Engineers.