War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0193 Chapter I. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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ticing at drill the fact of one of the guns being shotted was forgotten, and hence the occurrence.

I commence this morning to close the openings of the loopholes on the first tier solidly with stone. In raising the second 10-inch columbiad from the parade to the terre-plein yesterday afternoon the strap of the upper block broke when the gun was nearly up, and it fell, breaking the cross-pieces of the derrick, striking the end of the casemate arch of the first tier, and burying itself one-half its length in the ground. No one was injured, for the first signs of giving way had been observed and every one made to stand clear. The injury to the derrick will be soon repaired and the columbiad again hoisted.

Last night a severe storm of wind and rain arose, which lasted all night, and bids fair to be renewed to-day.

The men in the batteries on Morris Island are actively at work repairing damages to the parapets and in extending the field work around on the channel side of Cummings Point and forming new batteries there. Three or four 24-pounders on siege carriages were landed yesterday. I have before reported that the evident intention was to form a large field work entirely covering the point. Its present extent will require one thousand men to defend it, and the work still continues.

I have omitted to report previously that a guard ship, or bark, is anchored on the main ship bar, apparently as a signal ship; also, that the two revenue cutters taken from the Government are usually anchored on the side of the main ship channel towards Cummings Point-one of them northeast of the point and the other more to north of it. They are armed with guns or howitzers, probably of small caliber.

The storm of last night swamped one of the boats here. It was the Fort Moultrie barge, brought over with the command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Captain, Engineers.

No. 68.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., March 10, 1861.

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that we see only two parties, both quite large ones, at work to-day-one at the new battery, mentioned yesterday, near Fort Johnson, and the other on Morris Island, at the bend of the island, near No. 1. My command. thank God, is quite well, and in fine spirits.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

No. 69.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., March 11, 1861.

Colonel S. COOPER, Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that, perhaps in consequence of the prevalence of a high and cold wind, very little work appears to be going on around us. A few persons have been at work at the new battery near Fort Johnson, at Fort Moultrie, and also at the battery which fired on the Star of the West.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

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