War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0175 Chapter I. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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No. 46.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., February 16, 1861. [Received A. G. O., February 19.]

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that we cannot see that any work is being carried on at either of the works in sight, except that at Fort Moultrie they appear to be making some changes. They may, perhaps, be engaged in removing some of the heaviest of the guns of their battery, either to place them in the floating battery or on Morris Island, where their fire would be more effective against this work than it would be from Fort Moultie. By the by, I should like to be instructed on a question which may present itself in reference to the floating battery, viz: What course would it be proper for me to take if, without a declaration of war, or a notification of hostilities, I should see them approaching my fort with that battery? They may attempt placing it within good distance before a declaration of hostile intention.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

The wind is freshening as though it may be the commencement of storm.

No. 47.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., February 17, 1861. [Received A. G. O.,

February 21.]

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I have the honor to send herewith No. 44 [14th instant], which was accidentally omitted when the mail was made up on the 14th instant. I shall hereafter give my personal attention to the mailing of my letters for your office.

We could not see any work prosecuted yesterday except that by small gangs of negroes, who were shoveling sand at the western end of the bomb-proof battery on Cummings Point.

I saw in the Charleston papers of yesterday a call by the chief engineer for laborers to be engaged at work on the harbor defenses.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

FORT SUMTER, S. C., February 17, 1861.

General JOS. G. TOTTEN,

Chief Engineer U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: Everything is quiet, and there are no evidences of the presence of many troops around us, nor of military preparation. the assumption of all questions relating to forts, arsenals, &c., by the Congress of the Southern Confederacy appears to have placed a sudden check upon the military enterprise of the South Carolinians. The only operation performed yesterday was the firing of three shots from the iron bomb-proof battery on Cummings Point, apparently for the purpose of trying the embrasure shutters. These shutters appear to be of iron, and are arranged like a trap-door, with a hinge at the upper edge, so that two men can open it-having, probably, a counterpoise in the interior.