War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0171 Chapter I. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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bomb-proof battery, near which they are now [12 m.] landing supplies from a steamer.

I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

No. 42.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., February 12, 1861.

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

COLONEL: I have the honor to say that everything around us appears quiet. They are now relieving the companies on Morris Island-the troops leaving would, we think, muster about 175. A steamboat is now landing ammunition and other stores at Cummings Point.

I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

No. 43.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., February 13, 1861. [Received A. G. O.,

February 16.]

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that nothing unusual has occurred, excepting that one of the South Carolina guard-boats came too near to our walls last night, as noticed in my letter to the Hond. D. F. Jamison, a copy of which is herewith inclosed. Knowing that the Department would be interested in them, I shall send herewith three sketches, drawn by Captain Seymour, of this command, of Fort Johnson, Morris Island, and Fort Moultrie.* These sketches represent very prettily and accurately the batteries within our view, and other prominent objects in their vicinity, as seen through a spy-glass from our fort.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS, FORT SUMIER, S. C., February 13, 1861.

His Excellency F. W. PICKENS,,

Governor of South Carolina:

SIR: Knowing that your desire to prevent, and your determination, as far as in your power, to guard against the recurrence of anything calculated to add to the excitement which already unfortunately exists, I deem it my duty to report that the guard-boats, and occasionally small row-boats from Morris Island, have recently violated your orders by coming too near our walls. Yesterday morning one of the steamers- the General Clinch, I think-passed very near, and last night the guard-boats came nearer than was proper, twice-once about midnight, and again at 3.30 a.m.-when a steamer, although warned off by the sentinel, continued to approach, head on, until he fired his musket over her, when she altered her course. The gun-battery guard, I am happy to say, did not deem it necessary to fire.

Assuring you that every exertion will be made by me to guard against

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*Here omitted. To appear in Atlas.

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