War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0163 Chapter I. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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work nearest to us now presents the appearance of a battery, having an inclined guard in front to glance our balls off. They are using large quantities of railroad bars in their constructions on that point. The New York steamer sailed yesterday with our women and children.

I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

No. 34.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., February 5, 1861. [Received A. G. O.,

February 8.]

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: The character of the work on the end of Cummings Point nearest to us is, I think, now pretty well established. It seems to be a bomb-proof, with embrasures for the guns, the embrasures cut in a sloped wall, formed of heavy timbers, which is now being covered with railroad bars. This battery, though too far off for doing much damage to our walls, unless they have or get heavy rifled guns, will be pretty safe from the effect of our horizontal fires. They appear to be at work to-day connecting this battery with one between it and the battery which fired on the Star of the West, by means of a covered way. Their engineering appears to be well devised and well executed, and their works, even in their present condition, will make it impossible for any hostile force, other than a large and well-appointed one, to enter this harbor, and the chances are that it will then be at a great sacrifice of life. Our 10-inch columbiads are now in position. One points towards the city, one towards Fort Moultrie, and the third can be directed either towards Fort Moultrie or Morris Island. They are at an angle of from 30 to 35. I tried a shell, a few evenings ago, and we calculated that from a charge of two pounds we got a range of about two thousand yards. I have also four 8-inch sea-coast howitzers planted in the area at an angle of 39. These bear upon Morris Island. I am now removing the pieces of flagging from the area of our work, as I want it clear, hoping that should any shells fall in it they will probably sink so deep that they will not do much, if any, damage. Captain Foster is engaged in experimenting with one of the iron shutters, trying to see whether we can use them in the lower embrasures. It is very desirable that these embrasures shall be made as secure as possible.

I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

P. S.-Of course, in speaking of forcing an entrance, I do not refer to the little stratagem of a small party slipping in.