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embarked on 21 February. The party was joined there by one man from the staff of Admiral Hart (CINC Asiatic Fleet) ? Taylor, Grover W., Y1c.

Arriving in SNAPPER at Ezmouth Gulf on the west coast of Australia, the party there transferred on 26 February to USS HOLLAND, a submarine tender. She sailed shortly thereafter to the port of Fremantle, West Australia, where the party disembarked on 3 March and proceeded to the nearby city of Perth, where they awaited further orders.

Embarked in the USS CHAUMONT, A Navy transport, at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack was a group of six USNR yeomen and strikers who had received preliminary training at OP?20?G in Washington and were en route to augment the unit at Corregidor. CHAUMONT which had departed Pearl Harbor 29 November 1941 and was at sea on 7/8 December, was diverted from her scheduled itinerary; she put in at Suva, Fiji, and then at Brisbane, Australia, before proceeding to Port Darwin, arriving 5 January 1942 and unloading passengers and what cargo she carried. There the six yeomen joined another group consisting of two yeomen, two seamen, and a USNR Ensign, Louis A. Waters, also from OP?20?G. Whether this latter group was also in CHAUMONT, or if not, how they got to Port Darwin, has not been determined. By the end of January 1942, although two of the original CHAUMONT group of six had by that time become separated, the two groups had combined (List C) and had been ordered by Commander Southwest Pacific (COMSOWESPAC) to join the first Corregidor party at Perth.

On 8 March COMSOWESPAC informed Commander in Chief (COMINCH),Commander in Chief Pacific (COMINCPAC), Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV), Commander 14th Naval District (COM 14), and Commander 16th Naval District (COM 16) by dispatch that the special intelligence unit evacuated from Corregidor would be set up in Melbourne with an Australian unit, plus a small British communications intelligence (C.I.) unit from Singapore. On the same date LCDR Redfield Mason, then the Fleet Intelligence Officer on the staff of COMSOWESPAC, received orders from the latter to take charge of the four officers and thirteen men of the first Corregidor party, plus Yeoman Taylor and the party of one officer and eight men referred to in the preceding paragraph. He was to proceed with them to Melbourne, Australia and there set up a Fleet Radio Unit as specified in the dispatch just referred to. LCDR Lamb did not remain with the Corregidor group, but instead may have rejoined his ship at Fre mantle, where STINGRAY put in after emergency repairs had been completed at Surabaja.

Mason went from Perth to Melbourne by air, arriving on 12 March, while the rest of his party, consisting of five officers and 22 men, made the journey by train. In Melbourne they joined a Royal Australian Navy unit in Victoria Barracks. The Officer in Charge of the Australian unit was LCDR Jack Newman, R.A.N. (Royal Australian Navy), who was appointed Assistant Officer in Charge of the combined unit. Knowing that the rooms in Victoria Barracks would not accommodate the entire unit with the addition of personnel still expected to be evacuated from Corregidor, the ACNB (Australian Commonwealth Naval Board) acquired a block of flats known as the Monterey, into which the combined units moved and commenced operations. They remained in this location until late 1944, when a more suitable operating building was constructed by the ACNB for them in nearby Albert Park.

On 5 March 1942 COMINCH, in a priority dispatch to COMSIXTEEN(052220Z), had directed: "Evacuate personnel of Radio Intelligence Unit soon as possible. If space cannot be made available in submarine use any means of transportation to get them at least to Southern Philippines. Take all steps possible to prevent loss of personnel of Radio Intelligence Unit."

The second Corregidor party scheduled for evacuation consisted of 18 officers and men. When the submarine USS PERMIT arrived alongside the Corregidor



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