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Raymond (1863)
 
War:   American Civil War
 
Date(s):   12 May 1863
 
Location:   Hinds County, Mississippi, US
 
Outcome:   Union victory
 
Description:   Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson, USA Brig. Gen. John Gregg, CSA Gregg had a brigade-equivalent up against the Union XVII Corps.

It was a hard-fought little action, with about 440 Union and 560 Confederate casualties.

Ordered by Lt. Gen. John C. Pemberton, Confederate commander at Vicksburg, Brig. Gen. John Gregg led his force from Port Hudson, Louisiana, to Jackson, Mississippi, and out to Raymond to intercept approaching Union troops.

Before dawn on May 12, Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson had his XVII Army Corps on the march, and by 10:00 am they were about three miles from Raymond. Gregg decided to dispute the crossing of Fourteen Mile Creek and arrayed his men and artillery accordingly. As the Yankees approached, the Rebels opened fire, initially causing heavy casualties. Some Union troops broke, but Maj. Gen. John A. Logan rallied a force to hold the line. Confederate troops attacked the line but had to retire. More Union troops arrived and then counterattacked. Heavy fighting ensued that continued for six hours, but the overwhelming Union force prevailed.

Gregg's men left the field. Although Gregg's men lost the battle, they had held up a much superior Union force for a day.


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Selected sources:
American Battlefield Protection Program, Heritage Preservation Services, National Park Service.



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THESE ARE ARCHIVED PAGES OF THE OLD EHISTORY SITE
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