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Hoke’s Run (1861)
 
War:   American Civil War
 
Also known as:   Falling Waters, Hainesville
 
Date(s):   2 Jul 1861
 
Location:   Berkeley County, West Virginia, US
 
Outcome:   Union victory
 
Principal   Commanders:   Confederate: Thomas J. Jackson
 
Description:   Maj. Gen. Robert Patterson, USA

Patterson had a couple of brigades, Jackson one.

Casualties were light, under 25 for the Union and under 100 for the Confederacy.

On July 2, Maj. Gen. Robert Patterson’s division crossed the Potomac River near Williamsport and marched on the main road to Martinsburg. Near Hoke’s Run, Abercrombie’s and Thomas’s brigades encountered regiments of T.J. Jackson’s brigade, driving them back slowly. Jackson’s orders were to delay the Federal advance only, which he did, withdrawing before Patterson’s larger force.

On July 3, Patterson occupied Martinsburg but made no further aggressive moves until July 15, when he marched to Bunker Hill. Instead of moving on Winchester, however, Patterson turned east to Charles Town and then withdrew to Harpers Ferry.

This retrograde movement took pressure off Confederate forces in the Shenandoah Valley and allowed Johnston’s army to march to support Brig. Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard at Manassas. Patterson’s inactivity contributed to the Union defeat at First Manassas.


Content provided by:
eHistory Staff

Selected sources:
American Battlefield Protection Program, Heritage Preservation Services, National Park Service.



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