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Hanover Court House (1862)
 
War:   American Civil War
 
Also known as:   Slash Church
 
Date(s):   27 May 1862
 
Location:   Hanover County, Virginia, US
 
Outcome:   Union victory
 
Description:   Brig. Gen. Fitz John Porter, USA
Brig. Gen. J. R. Anderson, CSA

Both Porter had most of his corps against parts of Anderson’s 9,000 man division.

US casualties were about 400, Confederate losses a little over 900.

On May 27, 1862, elements of Brig. Gen. Fitz John Porter’s V Corps extended north to protect the right flank of McClellan’s Union army that now straddled the Chickahominy River. Porter’s objective was to cut the railroad and to open the Telegraph Road for Union reinforcements under Maj. Gen. Irvin McDowell that were marching south from Fredericksburg. Reinforcement was not likely, since Jackson was creating havoc in the Shenandoah Valley, but if the way was clear McClellan could more plausibly ask for the troops. But, even if reinforcements didn’t come, his movement would clear the J R Anderson’s division away from the otherwise-open Union flank.

Confederate forces, attempting to prevent this maneuver, were defeated just south of Hanover Courthouse after a stiff fight. The pulled back into the Richmond defenses, apparently all McClellan could ask for.


Content provided by:
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Selected sources:
American Battlefield Protection Program, Heritage Preservation Services, National Park Service.



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THESE ARE ARCHIVED PAGES OF THE OLD EHISTORY SITE
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