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Glasgow (1864)
 
War:   American Civil War
 
Date(s):   15 Oct 1864
 
Location:   Howard County, Missouri, US
 
Outcome:   Confederate victory
 
Description:   Col. Chester Harding, USA
Brig. Gen. John B. Clark and Brig. Gen. Joe Shelby, CSA

The US garrison was about 800; the Confederates had more men, but their exact strength is unknown.

Price lost about 50 men, but inflicted 400.

While Price led his men westward across Missouri, he decided to send a detachment to Glasgow to liberate weapons and supplies in an arms storehouse that reports said was weakly defended.

His combined force of mounted infantry, cavalry, and artillery laid siege to the town and the small fortifications on Hereford Hill. Before dawn on October 15, Confederate artillery started shelling the town and the Rebels advanced on Glasgow from several directions, forcing the Yankees to fall back. The Union forces retreated out of town and up the hill toward the fortifications on Hereford Hill. There they formed a defensive line, but the Confederates continued to advance. Convinced that he could not defend against another Confederate attack, Col. Harding surrendered around 1:30pm.

Although Harding had destroyed some Federal stores, Price’s men found rifles, overcoats, and horses. The Confederates remained in town for three days before rejoining the main column with their new supplies and weapons and heading towards Kansas City. The victory and capture of supplies and weapons were a boost to Price’s army's morale, although the engagement was a small one.


Content provided by:
eHistory Staff

Selected sources:
American Battlefield Protection Program, Heritage Preservation Services, National Park Service.



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THESE ARE ARCHIVED PAGES OF THE OLD EHISTORY SITE
These pages are not actively maintained and may have errors in content and functionality