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Meridian (1864)
 
War:   American Civil War
 
Date(s):   14 Feb 1864 - 20 Feb 1864
 
Location:   Lauderdale County, Mississippi, US
 
Outcome:   Union victory
 
Principal   Commanders:   Confederate: Leonidas Polk
Union: William T. Sherman
 
Description:   Sherman had a modest-sized Army against the local Confederate forces.

Total casualties are unknown.

Polk gathered a variety of local forces, stationed in the area more to deny it to Union patrols than as real fighting formations. His point of concentration was Morton, but he rapidly lost his nerve. Cavalry units commanded by Maj. Gen. Stephen D. Lee periodically skirmished with Sherman's advance guard. As Sherman approached Meridian, he met stiffer resistance from combined forces but steadily moved on. Polk finally realized that he could not stop Sherman and evacuated Meridian on the 14th, removing some railroad rolling stock to McDowell's Bluff. Sherman's troops entered Meridian the same day and began destroying railroad track, continuing their work until the 19th. Sooy Smith, the northern arm of the pincer, never arrived at Meridian.

Sherman left Meridian on the 20th, headed west by way of Canton, looking for Smith and his force. He did not discover what happened to Smith until he arrived back at Vicksburg. Sherman had destroyed some important Confederate transportation facilities but had to forget his aspirations for continuing into Alabama.


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Selected sources:
American Battlefield Protection Program, Heritage Preservation Services, National Park Service.



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THESE ARE ARCHIVED PAGES OF THE OLD EHISTORY SITE
These pages are not actively maintained and may have errors in content and functionality