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LaFourche Crossing (1863)
 
War:   American Civil War
 
Date(s):   20 Jun 1863 - 21 Jun 1863
 
Location:   Lafourche Parish, Louisiana, US
 
Outcome:   Union victory
 
Description:   Lt. Col. Albert Stickney, USA
Col. James P. Major, CSA

Stickney had under a thousand men against a Confederate cavalry brigade.

Confederate losses were a bit over 200; Union losses were roughly 50.

Maj. Gen. Richard Taylor sent an expedition under Col. James P. Major to break Union supply lines, disrupt Union activities and force an enemy withdrawal from Brashear City (now Morgan City) and Port Hudson.

Major set out from Washington, Louisiana, on Bayou Teche, heading south and east. While marching, his men raided Union garrisons, boats, and plantations and in the process captured animals and supplies and recaptured previously-liberated slaves. Brig. Gen. William H. Emory, commanding the defenses of New Orleans, assigned Lt. Col. Albert Stickney to command in Brashear City and to stem the Rebel raid if possible. Emory informed Stickney of Major’s descent on LaFourche Crossing and ordered him to send troops. Stickey thought there was no real threat to Brashear City, so he led troops to LaFourche Crossing, arriving on the morning of the 20th.

That afternoon Stickney's scouts reported that the enemy was advancing rapidly, and about 5pm the Rebel vanguard began driving in Stickney’s pickets. Confederate cavalry then pushed forward, but was driven back. After the Union troops fired a few rounds, the Confederates withdrew in the direction of Thibodeaux. Late the next afternoon, the Confederates tried again, skirmishing against the Union pickets. Fighting continued for more than an hour before the Rebels retired. About 6:30 pm, the Confederates reappeared in force, began an artillery bombardment, and charged the Union lines at 7pm. The Union line held after an hour of back-and-forth fighting, and the Confederates disengaged and retired toward Thibodeaux. The Union held the field.

While checked here, the Confederate raiders continued around the block, on to Brashear City.


Content provided by:
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Selected sources:
American Battlefield Protection Program, Heritage Preservation Services, National Park Service.



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THESE ARE ARCHIVED PAGES OF THE OLD EHISTORY SITE
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