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Vermillion Bayou (1863)
 
War:   American Civil War
 
Date(s):   17 Apr 1863
 
Location:   Lafayette Parish, Louisiana, US
 
Outcome:   Union victory
 
Description:   Brig. Gen. Cuvier Grover, USA
Maj. Gen. Richard Taylor, CSA

Grover had a division against the regional forces that Taylor could assemble.

No casualty figures are available.

After Union victories at Fort Bisland and Irish Bend, Taylor had to retreat up the bayou. He reached Vermillionville, crossed Vermillion Bayou, destroyed the bridge, and rested his weary men. Banks, in pursuit, sent two columns on different roads toward Vermillion Bayou on the morning of April 17. One column reached the bayou while the bridge was still burning, advanced, and began skirmishing with the Rebel rear-guard. Well-sited Confederate artillery struck the attackers, and forced them back. When Federal artillery arrived, it started a duel with the Confederate guns that lasted the rest of the day. After dark, the Rebels retreated to Opelousas. The Confederates had bought a little time, and slowed the Union advance. But that was all they could manage: Banks’ overall force was far too strong.


Content provided by:
eHistory Staff

Selected sources:
American Battlefield Protection Program, Heritage Preservation Services, National Park Service.



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THESE ARE ARCHIVED PAGES OF THE OLD EHISTORY SITE
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