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Page 153(Vietnamization & Redeployment)previous pagenext page


Department of Defense Photo (USMC) A 573446

Marines from a CUPP unit and a Popular Force soldier, who serves as their interpreter, question a woman suspected of providing assistance to the Viet Cong. The woman was detained and sent back to the district headquarters for more detailed interrogation.

there were many more villages in I Corps, not to men­tion Vietnam, than there were CAPs*

Building on Success: The Combined Unit Pacification Program

The effectiveness of the CAPs, combined with the diminution of contact with enemy main forces and the continuing guerrilla threat, led III MAP late in 1969 to institute the Infantry Company Intensified Pacifi­cation Program (ICIPP), in January 1970, redesignat-ed the Combined Unit Pacification Program (CUPP). Much of the impetus for this new program came from Lieutenant General Nickerson. Brigadier General Dulacki, the III MAF Chief of Staff, recalled that Nick­erson 'was . . . quite impressed with . . . what the combined action units were doing. And ... he felt pretty strongly that perhaps what we should do is start taking battalions and employing them in a similar fashion.' Still inclined towards conducting larger scale offensive operations the Army and Marine infantry di­visions under III MAF proved unwilling to commit en­tire battalions to such an unconventional mission and III MAF 'didn't want to force the idea on them.' Responding to this reluctance, however. III MAF de­veloped a plan for using companies, which the divi­sions accepted. Divisions were then directed to assign companies based upon their current employment and geographic locations.55

The Americal Division, then still under operation­al control of III MAF, assigned the first two compa­nies to CUPP, or at that time ICIPP, duty in October 1969, deploying squads from them in five hamlets in Quang Ngai. The 1st Marine Division joined the pro­gram the following month when Company M of the 1st Marines placed three squads in contested villages around Hill 55. By the end of the year, Company M had squads in eight hamlets, and the 5th and 7th Ma­rines were preparing to establish their own CUPP units.56 Ill MAF found that the success of these ac­tivities gradually began to instill confidence in the pro­gram within the 1st Division.

�According to Colonel Theodore E. Metzger, General Lewis Walt wrote the CAP commander a letter following a tour of CAF units in December 1969. saying, 'In the end, I firmly believe this pro­gram will be the most important innovation of this war.' Col The­odore E. Metzger, Comments on draft ms, 22Mar83 (Vietnam Comment File).



Page 153(Vietnamization & Redeployment)previous pagenext page



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THESE ARE ARCHIVED PAGES OF THE OLD EHISTORY SITE
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