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Responses to Immigration

Created and developed by Gregory Kupsky

Since the 1880s, immigration patterns have changed in a number of ways, but what about Americans' responses to immigration? This video examines the various reactions to newcomers around the turn of the century and during the world wars. It also urges the viewer to compare present-day responses to those of earlier times.

 

Russia and the Race for the Arctic

Global climate variations have caused unprecedented changes to the Arctic environment, especially a rapid decrease in the summer sea ice sheet. While perilous to the survival of the iconic polar bear, many humans are watching these changes with an eye to what riches an open Arctic Ocean might bring forth: in oil and gas, mining, and open-water transportation. Five countries can lay claim to the potential wealth of the Arctic Ocean: Canada, Denmark, Norway, Russia, and the United States.

Setting the International Stage for Invasion: The Diplomatic Underpinnings of the Grand Alliance

Peter L. Hahn, professor of history and department chair at The Ohio State University, analyzes the diplomatic underpinnings of the Grand Alliance in the period leading up to the D-Day invasion. He explores the international conflicts and agreements that set the stage for the greatest amphibious invasion of the war. This talk was part of "Remembering D-Day: A 70th Anniversary Commemoration" sponsored by the Department of History at Ohio State in June 2014.

Sex and Socialization in Sororities

The eHistory MultiMedia Course Projects were developed by students in Professor Judy Wu's History course 525 in 2008 and 2009. Our project looks at how sororities influence the sexual aspects of their participants. We look at the beginning of sororities and the change that has occurred in the purpose of them over time. The issue of sexual violence among the Greek system in relation to its members is also examined.

Student Activism in the 1960’s

Created by Amber Lash. This video is a digital project completed as part of Professor Lilia Fernandez's History 4015: Research in Modern U.S. History course in the spring of 2015.

The ambitions of government: Territoriality and infrastructural power in ancient Rome

Presented by Clifford Ando, University of Chicago, at the Center for Historical Research, Department of History at The Ohio State University on January 31, 2014. The last thirty years have been much fluctuation in the estimation of ancient empires as regards assessment of both their power and style of governance. Did ancient empires formulate and implement policies, or was ancient government largely reactive? Did they have the power or aspiration to penetrate deep into the territories they ruled, or were they content to rule through the cooptation of local elites and pre-existing institutions? Related inquiries have been launched into the importance of territoriality to ancient states, as well as the relationship between territoriality and imperialism: did Rome, or Persia, for that matter, recognize or materially mark firm borders of its control? Did their practice differ in regard to borders between administrative units within the empire? For that matter, when did ancient terms like imperium or provincia, "power of command" and "bailiwick," take on notions of spatial extension such that they could come to mean "empire" and "province?" These questions, which have scarcely been resolved, have taken on new urgency in light of the importance comparison has assumed in contemporary (ancient) empire studies.

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