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From April 1861 to April 1865, a brutal civil war was fought between the Confederate States of America and the United States of America. The American Civil War is one of the most researched conflicts in modern history, yet many people still desire more knowledge about it.

The roots of this tragic conflict go back to the birth of the country. The founding fathers, for all their wisdom, could not solve all the differences between the original thirteen states.
 
The products of their labors, the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, failed to totally define the relationship between the Federal Government and the States. The slavery question received no more than a partial and temporary solution.

These issues of states' rights festered and the rhetoric inside the Congress grew more heated. Finally, words were no longer enough for some and the nation began to split apart.
 
The secession of eleven Southern States and the unbending position of President Lincoln toward preserving the Union led to the first shot fired on Fort Sumter in 1861. The Rubicon had been crossed.

The next four years can only be described as an intensely fought conflict between two groups of Americans, each believing their cause was just. Over 380 major engagements were fought across 26 states.
 
Brother fought brother; almost every family felt the pain of war. Important cities were left in ruins and a generation of young men were much diminished in number.

Americans are still dealing with the original issues addressed by the founding fathers, striving to meet the needs and desires of a large and diverse population. However, the sacrifices of their ancestors, those brave and noble men and women who struggled from Fort Sumter to Appomattox and beyond, helped create the foundation to form an even more perfect union.

Please use the list of links on the left of this page to explore our comprehensive section on this important and pivotal event in American history. We hope you enjoy your journey and come away with a better understanding of our legacy.

Introduction by Jay Schroeder

Today in the Civil War
1862: Engagement at St. John's Bluff, Florida ...
1863: Skirmish at Elizabethtown, Arkansas ...
1864: Skirmishes at Athens and near Huntsville, Alabama ...
      > See More! <

HistoryList!
Regiments of the Civil War Irish Brigade
1. New York
2. New York
3. New York
4. Massachusetts
See entire List 



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THESE ARE ARCHIVED PAGES OF THE OLD EHISTORY SITE
These pages are not actively maintained and may have errors in content and functionality