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Page 84(Staunton River Bridge)Next Page


Staunton River Bridge

June 25, 1864
Also known as: Blacks and Whites, Old Men and Young Boys
Halifax County and Charlotte, VA
Campaign: Siege of Richmond and Petersburg

 

Brig. Gen. James Wilson and Brig. Gen. August Kautz, USA
Maj. Gen. William H.F. �Rooney�  Lee, CSA

Two Union cavalry divisions faced off against one Confederate cavalry division.

There were about 150 casualties in the skirmish.

On June 22, the cavalry divisions of Brig. Gens. James Wilson and August Kautz were dispatched from the Petersburg lines to disrupt Confederate rail communications.  Riding via Dinwiddie Court House, the raiders cut the South Side Railroad near Ford�s Station that evening, destroying tracks, railroad buildings, and two supply trains. On June 23, Wilson proceeded to the junction of the Richmond & Danville Railroad at Burke Station, where he encountered some of �Rooney� Lee�s cavalry between Nottoway Court House and Blacks and Whites (present-day Blackstone). Wilson followed Kautz along the South Side Railroad, destroying about thirty miles of track on his way. On June 24, while Kautz remained skirmishing around Burkeville, Wilson crossed over to Meherrin Station on the Richmond & Danville and began destroying track. On June 25, Wilson and Kautz continued tearing up track south to the Staunton River Bridge, where they were delayed by Home Guards, who prevented destruction of the bridge. Lee�s cavalry division closed on the Federals from the northeast, forcing them to abandon their attempts to capture and destroy the bridge. By this time, the raiders were nearly 100 miles from Union lines.

 



Page 84(Staunton River Bridge)Next Page



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THESE ARE ARCHIVED PAGES OF THE OLD EHISTORY SITE
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