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      eHistory  >  American Civil War  >  Battles  >  Monett’s Ferry ... Search
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Monett’s Ferry (1864)
 
War:   American Civil War
 
Also known as:   Cane River Crossing
 
Date(s):   23 Apr 1864
 
Location:   Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, US
 
Outcome:   Union victory
 
Description:   Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, USA
Brig. Gen. Hamilton P. Bee, CSA

Banks had a large Corps, Bee a cavalry division.

The Union lost about 200, the Confederates 400.

Near the end of the Red River Expedition, Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks’ army evacuated Grand Ecore and retreated to Alexandria, pursued by Confederate forces. Banks’ advance party, commanded by Brig. Gen. William H. Emory, encountered Brig. Gen. Hamilton P. Bee’s cavalry division near Monett’s Ferry (Cane River Crossing) on the morning of April 23. Bee had been ordered to dispute Emory’s crossing, and he placed his men so that natural features covered both his flanks. Reluctant to assault the Rebels in their strong position, Emory demonstrated against the Confederate center while two brigades went in search of another crossing. One brigade found a ford, crossed, and attacked the Rebel flank; Bee had to retreat. Banks’ men laid pontoon bridges and, by the next day, had all crossed the river. The Confederates at Monett’s Ferry missed an opportunity to destroy or capture Banks’ army.


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Selected sources:
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THESE ARE ARCHIVED PAGES OF THE OLD EHISTORY SITE
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