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      eHistory  >  American Civil War  >  Battles  >  Mine Run (Payne... Search
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Mine Run (1863)
 
War:   American Civil War
 
Also known as:   Payne’s Farm, New Hope Church
 
Date(s):   27 Nov 1863 - 2 Dec 1863
 
Location:   Orange County, Virginia, US
 
Outcome:   Inconclusive
 
Principal   Commanders:   Confederate: Robert E. Lee
Union: George G. Meade
 
Description:   Meade had about 70,000 men against Lee’s roughly 45,000.

Casualties were light, about 1,300 Union and 700 Confederate.

Payne’s Farm and New Hope Church were the first and heaviest clashes of the Mine Run Campaign. In late November 1863, Meade attempted to steal a march through the Wilderness and strike the right flank of the Confederate army south of the Rapidan River.

Maj. Gen. Jubal A. Early in command of Ewell's Corps marched east on the Orange Turnpike to meet the advance of William French’s III Corps near Payne’s Farm. Carr’s Union division attacked twice. Johnson’s Confederate division counterattacked but was scattered by heavy fire and broken terrain. After dark, Lee withdrew to prepared field fortifications along Mine Run. The next day the Union army closed on the Confederate position. Skirmishing was heavy, but a major attack did not materialize.

By the end of the day Lee had spotted an opening on Meade’s left and was preparing a counter-attack. But Meade concluded that the Confederate line was too strong to attack and retired during the night of December 1-2, ending the winter campaign. Lee’s attack was launched at dawn on December 2, but ‘hit the air’ and could only pick through the debris of Union campgrounds.


Content provided by:
eHistory Staff

Selected sources:
American Battlefield Protection Program, Heritage Preservation Services, National Park Service.



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