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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 6, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
Page 632 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.


HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
Washington, D. C., December 2, 1863.

Brigadier General M. C. MEIGS, Chattanooga:

It is not deemed expedient to employ prisoners of war on public works or as laborers.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

(Copy to Commissary-General of Prisoners.)

COLUMBUS, OHIO, December 2, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

By dispatch just received from the mayor of Toronto I am advised that Morgan is not in that city. The volunteer State force within fifty miles of the lake shore will vary but little from 10,000. They will make a most reliable body of troops. I have not the means to complete their armament of furnish them ammunition, and ask authority to make requisition on your ordnance officer here for both.

DAVID TOD,

Governor.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, December 2, 1863-8 p. m.

Governor TOD, Columbus:

It is in my judgment by no means improbable that Morgan is still in Columbus, secreted with some copperhead. You may increase the reward for his capture to $5,000, and stimulate every diligence for his apprehension. The arming and equipping your lake-shore guard will be provided for without delay.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

ENTERPRISE, December 2, 1863.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

I have written you on the subject of the construction of the language of the parole given by our prisoners. It is desirable the Government should decide how far they are subject to military duty and of what kind. This is necessary to discipline and should be done at once. Can they be armed and drilled and made to police their own encampment?

[Can] officers serve on court-martial for paroled prisoners?

L. POLK,

Lieutenant-General.

[Indorsement.]

DECEMBER 4, 1863.

According to agreement between the two Governments paroled prisoners cannot be employed on any military duty while on parole.

S. C.

WASHINGTON, D. C., December 3, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of my inspection of the condition of Camp Douglas and other prison camps, made pursuant to your instructions of the 13th ultimo.


Page 632 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 6, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
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