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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 7, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
Page 57 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

CHICAGO, ILL., April 16, 1864.

Colonel JAMES A. HARDIE, Inspector-General U. S. Army:

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

Commanding officer, Brigadier General W. W. Orme, U. S. Volunteers. In command of garrison, Colonel James C. Strong, Fifteenth Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps. Commissary of prisoners, Major L. C. Skinner, Eighth Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps.

General Orme gives very little personal attention to his command at Camp Douglas. The result is a want of harmony and efficiency in the management of every department of this command. There is also a want of courtesy on the part of the commanding officer toward the commander of the garrison. Colonel Strong and Major Skinner would be valuable officers serving under an efficient commander.

The sutler for prisoners was appointed by General Orme. He has no "list" posted up. Sales restricted to articles authorized by law. The Eighth, Eleventh, and Fifteenth Regiments Veteran Reserve Corps have each a sutler appointed by the regimental commander. These regimental sutlers all sell pies, candies, and cider. No list of prices posted up at store of Eighth and Eleventh Regiments. No pecuniary transactions discovered between officers and sutlers or persons furnishing supplies for prisoners.

The discipline and efficiency of the garrison is good, but can be improved. The barracks and grounds are not properly policed.

All necessary precautions are taken to prevent the escape of prisoners. Their health, food, and clothing is satisfactory. The barracks are in bad condition; the floors ripped up, the bunks filthy, and the blankets not properly aired. The grounds are without proper drainage and badly policed. There is an entire lack of discipline and system in the whole management of the prisoners.

The present prisoners' hospital outside the prison yard should be transferred to the garrison and a hospital for prisoners constructed within the yard.

Post fund April 16, 1864, $268. 66. Money sent to prisoners intelligibly accounted for.

Post qutain Charles Goodman, U. S. Volunteers.

Balance due United States April 16, 1864, $5,527. 10.

Business carefully of subsistence and treasurer of prison fund, Captain N. W. Edwards, U. S. Volunteers.

Prison fund April 16, $8,947. 14; subsistence fund, $8,102. 36; total, $17,049. 50.

Quality of stores good. All balances reported, counted, and found correct. The garrison should not be reduced. Smallpox increasing among prisoners; decreasing in garrison.

Number of prisoners April 15, 5,435.

I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN F. MARSH,

Lieutenant Colonel Twenty-fourth Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps.

[Indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, April 29, 1864.

Copy respectfully furnished for the information of Colonel Hoffman.

The commanding officer of Camp Douglas has been directed to give more of his personal attention to the management and internal arrange-


Page 57 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION AND CONFEDERATE.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 7, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
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