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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 25, Part 2 (Chancellorsville)
Page 509 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

to Gauley Bridge, losing some wagons. This might have been done by Jones on his retreat. If the Ninth goes thought, I will telegraph Scammon to meet them from Gualey Brigade.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, MD.,

May 20, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel PIATT,

Grafton:

They have fought Scammon's men at Fayette and been beaten off, although they were two to one. Scammon thinks they may possibly try Gauley next; if so, they will doubtless go down the Lewisburg turnpike and be stopped at Tompkins' farm. I hope the Ninth Virginia can go through to Gauley. Some cavalry should be sent at least to escort and help them on.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE,

May 20, 1863.

Brigadier General W. W. AVERELL,

Grafton, Va.:

General Roberts has not apprehended the purpose of the general commanding as to moving forward whatever force could be sent to Summerville. No regular campaign nor permanent occupation was intended, but only a quick movement, light-armed, to relieve Scammon by a diversion. Large supply trains would not be required for such an expedition. The Army of the Potomac was moved for eighth days with three days' rations in haversacks, five days' rations and extra ammunition in knapsacks, without a wagon,but only two pack-mules to a regiment. No further news from General Scammon. Report what you can do, if necessary.

WM. H. CHESEBROUGH,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

BALTIMORE,

May 20, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

RESPECTED SIR: Pardon the liberty I have taken in addressing you, but I hope my motives will be a sufficient excuse.

I have been informed by one who seems to be pretty well versed in the affairs of rebeldom, that the rebels intend to invade Maryland, and endeavor to capture Baltimore and Washington. He states that this will be done in about three weeks unless something should be done to frustrate their intended movement.

The reasons for this movement by the rebels are these, viz:

1. They think that General Hooker's army has been thinned by the troops that have returned home, and is consequently in a weak condition.

2. They are of the opinion that a large proportion of the army around


Page 509 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 25, Part 2 (Chancellorsville)
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