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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 4, vol 1, Part 1 (Blockade Runners)
Page 484 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

JACKSON, MISS., July 17, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

The two regiments at Iuka are not armed, and I have no power under our laws to arm them. Say to the President [I] have called the Legislature and will send him all the troops and arms I have power to send.

JOHN J. PETTUS.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, July 17, 1861.

Hon. GEORGE W. MUNFORD,

Secretary of the Commonwealth of Virginia:

SIR: Your letter of July 11, communicating the reply of the Auditing Board of the State of Virginia to the requisition made by Colonel Joseph Selden, superintendent of the recruiting service for the Provisional Army, in behalf of James G. Paxton, recruiting officer at Covington, Va., and asking the attention of this Department to the inquiries contained therein, has been received. Your letter is not sufficiently explicit in its details to enable this Department to make any special reply with reference to this particular case. But with regard to the general question involved, this Department begs leave to reply that the Confederate Government has no recruiting service, nor was this Department advised that any recruiting was going on in Virginia at this time, except only to fill up the Wise Legion and Floyd brigade. It is true that all the legitimate expenses attending military operations in Virginia are now chargeable to the Confederate Government, and have been so since the date indicated in your latter, and therefore, although this recruiting has not been done by order of this Department, yet if the troops so recruited have gone into the service of the Confederate Government, it would be right for that Government to pay such charges as are just and proper. It is proper to add, however, that the Government of the Confederate States is relying upon the volunteer forces, and not upon the recruiting service, for its troouiting department should therefore be at once discontinued by the authorities of Virginia, unless actually in successful operation.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully,

L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War.

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE,

RICHMOND, FREDERICKSBURG AND POTOMAC R. R. CO.,

Richmond, July 17, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President of the Confederate States:

DEAR SIR: Since my interviews with you of Saturday and Sunday evenings, desiring to leave nothing undone in my power which can promote your efforts for the public defense, I have had made by the city engineer of Richmond, who is also a skillful and experienced railroad engineer, surveys and estimates both of the time and expense required to construct merely temporary connections for military purposes only between the railroads running north and south and terminating in Richmond and Petersburg. Those estimates I herein


Page 484 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 4, vol 1, Part 1 (Blockade Runners)
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