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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 6, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
Page 372 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

strength - prisoners of war, 6,085; guard, First Michigan Sharpshooters, 651; Invalid Corps, 309; other regiments, 18; total, 978; aggregate, 7,063. Location of camp -four miles south of center of city of Chicago, Ill., one-eighth of a mile east of shore of Lake Michigan. Time occupied - established March, 1862; present occupation since August 18, 1863. Water-source and supply, city water - works, from lake; supply deficient, there being but three hydrants in camp; quality and effects, good. Fuel -coal and wood. Soil - sandy, very good. Drainage-very deficient, but works are in progress which will materially improve it. Topography - prairie land. Meteorology-much rain, high winds. Police of camp-very much neglected, except in barracks of Invalid Corps. Discipline in camp-very lax. Duties in camp-none required of prisoners; many volunteer to work. Tents or huts, pattern and quality - all the barracks are of one story, the pattern is good, but they are very much in need of repair. Tents or huts, ventilation-utterly insufficient. Tents or huts -sufficiency, for 4,500 prisoners, if all barracks were fit for occupation, utterly insufficient for present number. Tents or huts, heating-hospital and guard barracks well heated by stoves; very few of the prison barracks are heated at all. Sinks, construction - bad. Excavations twenty feet long, six feet wide, four feet deep; not closed in. Sinks, condition and position-center of main prisoners' square and rear of guard barracks. Sinks, management - apparently no management at all, in filthy condition. Removal of off all, &c. -not well attended to; no receptacles provided. Previous use of camp - first as fair grounds by State Agricultural Society, then as depot for Federal paroled prisoners. Rations-abundant and good. Cooking in camp-in hospital good, for guard tolerable, in prison barracks no attention is paid to cooking by authorities. Portable ovens - two stationary ovens ready for use, but not used; two other could be readily repaired for use. Vegetable-plenty for hospital, potatoes only issued to prisoners. Cleanliness of men - guard and sick very good; prisoners generally filthy; deficient facilities for cleanliness. Cleanliness of clothing - hospital very good; laundry facilities very deficient. Quality of clothing- hospital good. Quantity of clothing-hospital deficient, very deficient for prisoners; some clothing sent to prisoners by friends. Blankets and bedding hospital bedding is very deficient; about 1,200 prisoners are without blankets. Habits of men-some would be cleanly if they could, but most are filthy. Condition of men-bad. Hospital buildings-in south west corner of camp; the chapel is about being fitted up for a hospital. Hospital police-in hospital, for guard, very good; in prisoners' hospital not as good as it ought to be. Hospital discipline-not as strict as it should be. Hospital diet and cooking-good, but cooking arrangements not carefully inspected. Hospital, heat and ventilation-well heated by stoves; ventilation utterly lost sight of. Hospital, capacity -very deficient; present capacity, for guard, 50; prisoners, 120; the chapel will increase this to 180. Number sick-guard 50, prisoners 325. State of medical supplies-good. State of surgical instruments -good, but deficient in quantity. State of hospital records-in most respects well kept. State of hospital accounts-well kept. State of hospital fund-none on hand for prisoners; about $120 for guard hospital. Reports-well attended to, except report of deaths to Commissary-General of Prisoners. Medical attendance- deficient; two more medical officers should be detailed to this post. Nursing-nurses (rebel) not kept under sufficiently strict discipline Interments - by contraction city cemetery. Diseases, prevalent-typhoid fever, pneumonia. Diseases, zymotic-several cases of measles which are not isolated as they should be. Diseases prevention of-not sufficient care taken to prevent disease. Wounds and operations-none


Page 372 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 6, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
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