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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 4, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
Page 279 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

fond yet. A hole was found dug under the fence at another point and the musket and equipments of the sentinel on the ground, but the sentinel was gone and doubtless some prisoners escaped by collusion with him. The name of the sentinel who deserted is Private Charles White, Company C, Sixty-seventh - Regiment Illinois Volunteers. The man was enlisted in Chicago. I have given notice to the police authorities in the city who will co-operate with my force in endeavoring to capture the escaped prisoners and the deserter.

I am carrying into effect the directions in regard to the fences contained in your letter of the 20th instant. These improvements were urgently needed as the insecurity of the fences is a constant temptation to the prisoners to attempt to escape, and numerous props and irregularities on the inside afford ready means of climbing over quickly. The structure and form of this camp is very unsuitable for the confinement of prisoners and it is impossible to increase the number of sentinels on duty with our present force. The guard details is 1 captain, 7 lieutenants, 13 sergeants, 24 corporals and 382 privates. Besides this a patrol force is on duty every night outside the fence, the extent of which is estimated to be three miles. I have abundant evidence that there are numerous traitorous sympathizers in Chicago who are constantly on the alert to aid prisoners to escape and are ingenious in their schemes to communicate with them and corrupt our own soldiers. I have no hesitation in saying that in my opinion martial law should be declared over the city of Chicago and the command vested in the commanding officer this camp.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER,

Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, Commanding.

P. S. -Some of the prisoners who escaped last nigh are being retaken.

J. H. T.


HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 24, 1862.

Colonel WILLIAM HOFFMAN,
Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of the 20th instant. The telegram for number of escaped prisoners was received late on Saturday and reply sent to office immediately. I have commenced the measures for the greater security of the prisoner directed and will prosecute them to completion with all diligence.

I forward estimate for clothing for prisoners and would ask you to authorize the issue, as it is immediately necessary for decency, health and safety. Many of the prisoners are entirely destitute and without a change, while others have portions of citizen's dress which they had received before I assumed command. This I wish to take from them and substitute a cheap dress which Captain Potter has on hand, some of which was taken from the enemy. He has not a sufficient amount of captured clothing. He can get more like it manufactured. I forward an estimate made by S. S. Greeley for introduction of sewer, for sinks connected therewith and for the supply of water, for the camp. This estimate I am informed was handed to you by Mr. Greeley while you were here. I do not send the estimate as approved by me; I merely lay it before you. I inclose estimate for bakery.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER,

Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, Commanding.


Page 279 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 4, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
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