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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 4, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
Page 106 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

Said request seeming to the commanding general to be reasonable, so much of said order is revoked, and the remainder will be executed.

By order of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, Numbers 152.
New Orleans, June 30, 1862.

John W. Andrews exhibited a cross, the emblem of the suffering of our blessed Savior, fashioned for a personal ornament which he said was made from the bones of a "Yankee soldier," and having shown this too without rebuke in the Louisiana Club which claims to e composed of chivalric gentlemen, it is therefore ordered that for this desecration of the dead he be confined at hard labor for two years on the fortifications at Ship Island, and that he be allowed no verbal or written communication to or with any one except through these headquarters.

By order of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS,
Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

SHERMAN'S HOTEL, Chicago, June 30, 1862.

Colonel HOFFMAN, U. S. Army.

SIR: I thank you for the privilege extended by your courtesy to visit Camp Douglas, from which I have just returned. If you have yourself been there it is wholly unnecessary for me to say that the place is as desperately circumstanced as any camp ever was, and that nothing but a special providence or some peculiar efficacy of the lake winds can prevent it from becoming a source of pestilence before another month has gone over our heads. The amount of standing water, of unpoliced grounds, of foul sinks, of unventilated and crowded barracks, of general disorder, of soil reeking with miasmatic accretions, of rotten bones and the emptyings of camp-kettles is enough to drive a sanitarian to despair. I hope that no thought will be entertained of mending matters. The absolute abandonment of the spot seems the only judicious course. I do not believe that any amount of drainage would purge that soil loaded with accumulated filth, or those barracks fetid with two stories of vermin and animal exhalations. Nothing but fire can cleanse them. I rejoice that you have come at such an opportune moment, for a week's delay at this critical season when the hot weather is about setting in with violence might cost many lives. It will be a great relief to hear that the place is abandoned and a true camp established in some gravelly region. I hope that ridge ventilation carried the whole length of the building will be adopted in any new edifices and that a careful system od drainage will be adopted from the start. If in the pressure of your engagements you choose to call on the Sanitary Commission for any plan for the camp of 10,000 men or a proper and economical style of barracks I shall be most happy to send a plan and even an architect at the expense of the Commission to aid your purpose. Excuse the liberty I take in addressing you in this private manner. Having no report to make outside I have thought it my duty to send you these few rods just as I am leaving Chicago for the East. I shall be in New York after Wednesday next.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY W. BELLOWS,

President of the Sanitary Commission.


Page 106 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 4, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
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