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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 40, Part 2 (Richmond, Petersburg)
Page 701 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

whether entering at New Inlet or Caswell, to come under your guns at Smithville, establishing but a single quarantine ground. The guard at Fort anderson should be considerably strengthened. I consider it absolutely necessary that the navy should make every effort in this matter possible, and should attend particularly, so far as is in their power, to keeping the river patrolled. that portion of it which is not covered by batteries, and from which I have been compelled by necessity to withdraw troops, ought to be constantly under the watch and guard of the navy. Please to advise with the flag officer, to whom I also will send a request and you may communicate these suggestions.

Very respectfully,

W. H. C. WHITING,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., June 29, 1864.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of the 28th instant relative to the necessity of obtaining a supply of railroad iron. I agree with you as to the only mode of accomplishing it, and have already taken active measures to remove the iron from the less important roads. I shall have to encounter injunctions and vexatious litigations, but the necessity is, in my judgment, too imperative to allow hesitation in assuming the responsibility of disregarding such proceedings so far as they would prevent immediate command of iron. In this course I trust to be sustained, if necessary, by the merited influence of your name and judgment. A force under the direction of an engineer is already engaged in taking up iron on the York River road. Unless necessity requires, which I hope will not be the case, the road within the defenses will be retained intact.

Very respectfully,

JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., June 29, 1864.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 28th instant with regard to the repair of the Danville railroad has been received. I am happy to have anticipated your wishes in every particular expressed. Not a day was lost after the injury was inflicted before the officers of the Department, with all the laborers that could be commanded, were engaged in the work of reports as enable me to judge of the extent of the injury or the time required for repairs, but measures have been taken to ascertain them; and all the resources of the Department will be employed in restoring the road to moving condition at the earliest possible period. Proper representations have any reference to the restoration of the road. Indeed, it has been me policy, so far as with reference to the truth and propriety I could, to induce the public impression that the injury is more serious and


Page 701 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 40, Part 2 (Richmond, Petersburg)
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