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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 52, Part 2 (Supplements)
Page 549 Chapter LXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--CONFEDERATE.


HEADQUARTERS NINTH Kentucky CAVALRY,
October 25, 1863.

General LONGSTREET:

The enemy reported yesterday in Nickajack Cove, supposed to be a pioneer corps, are engaged in removing the engine and works from Gordon's Mills. They evidently intend it for a mill at the bridge or a boat to forage on the river. With a regiment of infantry from General Law's brigade and my cavalry I will capture them or stop their work on the mill. Will an order for the regiment be sent?

AUSTIN,

Major.

[31.]

GENERAL LONGSTREET'S HEADQUARTERS,

October 25, 1863.

Major AUSTIN,

Ninth Kentucky Cavalry:

Your dispatch received. General Jenkins will send a brigade to capture the party at Nickajack Cove, with which you will co-operate.

LONGSTREET,

General.

[31.]


HEADQUARTERS NINTH Kentucky,
October 25, 1863.

Captain MANNING:

The enemy have moved the engine from Gordon's Mills to Shellmound Depot and are now engaged in building a bridge over Nickajack Creek. They are 500 strong, as reported by scout.

AUSTIN,

Major, Ninth Kentucky Cavalry.

[31.]

CAMP RAPPAHANNOCK, October 26, 1863.

General LONGSTREET:

MY DEAR GENERAL: I have received your three letters--September 26, October 6, and October 11. The first was received just as I was about to make a mobve upon General Meade to prevent his detaching re-enforcements to Rosecrans, the second when I had gone as far as I thought I could advantageously go, and the third since my return to this place. I have read them all with interest and pleasure, but have not had time to reply till now. I rejoice in your geat victory deeply. It seemed to me to have been complete. I wish it coudl have ben followed up by the destruction of the Federal army. As regards your porposition as to myself, I wish I could feel that it was prompted by other reasons than kind feelings to myself. I think youc an do better than I could. It was with that view I urged your going. The Prteisdent, being on the ground, I hope will do al that can be done. He has to take a broad view of the whole ground, and must order as he deems best. I will cheerfully do anything in my power. In addition to other infirmities, I have bens uffering so much from rheumatism in my back that I coudl scarcely get about. The first two days of our march I had to be hauled in a wagon, and subsequently every motion of my horse, and indeed of my body, gave much pain. I am rather better now,


Page 549 Chapter LXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--CONFEDERATE.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 52, Part 2 (Supplements)
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