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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
Page 504 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

I can get no information of the position or strength the army (Confederate) near Fredericksburg. Can you give me none?

We depend upon the Virginia for the defense of James River. The batteries on the south side are useless.

Relays of couriers are placed on the road and a telegraph office established at Tunstall's Station, some 5 miles hence.

Most respectfully, you obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

ENGINEER BUREAU,

Richmond, May 9, 1862.

JOHN B. STANARD,

In charge of Richmond Defenses:

SIR: Colonel Goode, Major Allen, and other artillery officers have been directed to mount the 32-pounder guns on ship carriages around this city, and I wish you to point out to these officers, as I have pointed out to you, the places where they are to place the guns, and furnish them every facility for forwarding the work at your command.

ALFRED L. RIVERS,

Acting Chief Engineer Bureau.

RICHMOND, VA., May 9, 1862.

Captain J. R. BRANCH, Petersburg:

Push the drill of your battery, and if the enemy's gunboats enter the Appomattox, choose a position where you can fire upon them to advantage, and do your utmost to defend the obstruction in the river. You will only obey orders from your military superiors.

G. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, va., May 10, 1862.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General:

SIR: Have such of your records and papers as ought to be preserved, and are not required for constant reference, packed in boxes, for removal and marked, so as to designate the bureau to which they belong. Books and papers necessary for constant reference may be kept in the presses, but boxes must be prepared for them. This is only intended as a prudent step, and is not caused by any bad news from the army. There is no need, therefore, for any panic in the city, and it should be prevented by the assurance that we have every reason to think that the city be successfully defended.

G. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.

(The same to Colonel Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance; Colonel L. B. Northrop, Commissary-General; S. P. Moore, Surgeon-General, and Colonel A. C. Myers, Quartermaster-General.)


Page 504 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
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